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owning-my-truth:


The 2014 Retreat for LGBTQ Muslims (and Partners) is a project of the Muslim Alliance for Sexual and Gender Diversity (MASGD). The retreat is organized by a committed group of volunteers on the Retreat Planning Team, including members of the Muslim Alliance.

The 2014 Retreat for LGBTQ Muslims (and Partners) follows on three successful events held in 2011, 2012, and 2013, each of which brought together more than 70 people from 4 countries, for a weekend of powerful dialogue, spiritual nourishment and emotional renewal.  
Participant testimonials demonstrate the power of this amazing event.

The LGBT Muslim Retreat aims to be inclusive of all Muslims including those that identify with Islam politically, culturally, religiously, ideologically and/or spiritually. 

The retreat seeks sponsorship, donations, and other funding, as it is not funded by any outside organization. 
SIGNAL BOOST!
Follow up question, how do you feel about teaching things like math and science? (And doing so through Swahili, not English). Are there other ways to be involved in supporting this country in a healthy way that doesn't promote white supremacy? And, is there anything problematic with simply journeying there and immersing yourself in the culture of that area? (Simply to learn, not attempting to teach or bring western ideas to these areas.) (Thanks for answering my other question too!)
kaanbe kaanbe Said:

owning-my-truth:

Why do people feel like as a foreigner with no experience in a particular country that they can teach math and science better than local teachers who know their communities and students far better than they ever will? It’s really mind blowing. And this isn’t just you. It’s many people, predominantly white, but non-white Western POC as well. I say this as someone who "taught english" abroad myself. 

I think travel can be a great way to learn about another culture. But if the motivation underlying it is one of domination (“I need to help these people”), it’s most likely better to first analyze your reasons for why you want to go to X or Y country. Then work to unlearn and internally deconstruct these systems of domination, which we all have imbibed, particularly those of us operating from positions of privilege (white, especially), before going on your trip.

Not only TOMS, but also Starbucks and even Lockheed Martin and Wal-Mart have learned that linking their products to charitable causes makes for good business. We no longer buy only what we need, or even what broadcasts our identity. We buy what makes us feel like good people, and what makes us feel like members of a good, global community. The easy way to look at TOMS is to praise their charitable work. The harder, more troubling way to look at TOMS is to acknowledge it as an example of how corporations have assumed work most often associated with self-identified religious organizations: building community, engaging in charity, and cultivating morals.

TOMS is not alone in its willingness to link progressive social action with consumer spending. In fact, it exemplifies a broader corporate embrace of “conscious capitalism.” Coined by Whole Foods CEO John Mackey, this business model assumes that “the best way to maximize profits over the long-term” is to orient business toward a “higher purpose.” So Starbucks sells coffee to “Put America Back to Work,” the (RED) campaign raises money to fight AIDS, and—in the best example yet—Sir Richard’s Condom Company sends a condom to Haiti for each one it sells (“doing good never felt better”). Meanwhile, Bank of America logos decorate PRIDE banners and Lockheed Martin brags that it is a “champion of diversity.”

The globalization of neoliberal capitalism, and particularly the popularity of “conscious capitalism” as a practice and a discourse, signals a change in the landscape of U.S. religion and politics. “Neoliberalism” most often refers to a loosely cohering set of economic, social, and political policies that (1) seek to secure human flourishing through the imposition of free markets and (2) locate “freedom” in individual autonomy, expressed through consumer choice. But it is also a mode of belonging, where ritual acts of consumption initiate individuals into a global community of consumer agents. Within neoliberal logics of religious and political action, consumer transactions and corporate expansion are recast as forms of spiritual purification and missionary practice. And within conscious capitalism, the “higher purpose” is a world in which all people have a chance (or obligation) to participate in free markets—understood as a multicultural community of consumers.

For Mycoskie—whose title is “Chief Shoe Giver”—building this multicultural community is a theological mandate. He frames his Christian faith as a component of his personal relationship to the company. At the evangelical Global Leadership Conference, keynote speaker Mycoskie answered a question about whether TOMS represents any “biblical principles”: “TOMS represents a lot of different biblical principles. But the one I go back to again and again is the one in Proverbs. Give your first fruits and your vats will be full. … Because we did that and stayed true to our one-to-one model [even amidst financial strain], we’ve been incredibly blessed. We really did give our first fruits.”

In non-confessional settings, TOMS proffers a humanistic version of this prosperity gospel, recast for a neoliberal age. Losing the Bible quotes, the company emphasizes that the “fruits of faith”—in this case, economic success—abound for those who embody the ideals of authenticity, good intentions, and service. Or, “higher purpose” is profitable. TOMS is successful because it creates opportunities for people to live into their own “purpose” through a simple transaction: buying a pair of shoes.

christiancgtomas:

I was speaking out of irritation at the ignorant comments that were being made at Las Vegas’ First Black Film Festival, and someone I know made this lovely little comment so I had put my two cents in. Some arguments I made were grammatically unsound (that very last sentence, yikes), but whatevs. It’s 10 PM and I have to go to bed.

(via fyeahcracker)

The emotional, sexual, and psychological stereotyping of females begins when the doctor says: ‘It’s a girl.’
Shirley Chisholm (via owning-my-truth)

badbilliejean:

blackourstory:

Happy Black History YEAR!

Greatness.

(via nortonism)

fitnessluvr:

takeherawayern:

whiskersonkittens:

Things that don’t make you less of a feminist:

  • Being in a loving relationship.
  • BDSM.
  • Being submissive.
  • Wearing makeup.
  • Being a housewife.
  • Wearing dresses.
  • High heels.
  • Shaving.

Things that do make you less of a feminist:

  • Shaming women for doing any of these things.

Thank you

(via nortonism)

misandrist:

madravenclawwithahat:

swanjolras:

thebrokenhunterandhisbrokenangel:

worldofdrakan:

its-heaven-nowadays:

More Macklemore, less Robin Thicke.

And yet a huge percentage of Tumblr hates him. Not trying to be confrontational, but could someone please explain to me why this is?

Because he is a straight white guy and Tumblr isn’t always right. 

oh my god if i have to see this post on my dashboard one more time

all right, okay. let’s talk.

last year on a slow day in law/society class, my teacher showed us a movie where charlize theron was one of the only female workers in a mine in minnesota. she experienced a fuckload of sexual harassment, ofc; it was when she started daring to complain about the sexual harassment that shit got really bad.

i remember watching charlize theron go through all these awful things, and i remember getting vaguely invested in her as a heroine; yeah, you go charlize theron, you continue to work despite these harassment and assaults, you stand up for yourself when people shun you in the community, etc

and there was this climactic scene where the miners’ union was having a meeting, and charlize theron was going up to complain about something or tell people she was suing the company or smth, i can’t remember, and she stood there in front of this huge crowd of angry men who were booing her and catcalling her and shouting the worst things at her and she’s getting really miserable

and then her father, who also works at the mine, goes up and says “hey, you’re all jerks, think of your mothers & daughters, would you treat them this way,” and the miners are like “oh wow charlize theron totally does deserve our support etc” and then the movie continues

but all i could think was— what, so they’ll listen to a man but not to the woman who’s actually affected? why doesn’t charlize theron get to save the day and be the hero? in a conversation about sexism, why is his voice more important than hers?

we’re not mad at macklemore. or— well, we are mad at macklemore, but we’re more mad at the system that prioritizes macklemore over actual queer rappers, over actual rappers of color, who have been saying exactly the same shit for decades and been ignored.

we’re mad at the system that gives more attention to straight allies than queer activists.

we’re mad at the system that only supports queer rights when they are quiet and polite and have cute graphics.

we’re mad at the system that makes macklemore a hero of of the queer struggle but doesn’t know marsha p. johnson’s name.

we’re mad at the system that will listen to macklemore when he comes to defend us— but won’t listen to us.

we’re mad at the system that has constructed itself to make damn certain that only straight cis white boys can be heroes.

it’s fuckin’ great that macklemore thought he was gay in third grade. but the system would rather give his third grade gay freakout the spotlight than our actual whole-life queer experiences— and that’s not okay.

That commentary. Spot on.

Damn.

whewwwwww

(via owning-my-truth)

kateoplis:

NPR covers all 2,428 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border, so you don’t have to.

The results are beautiful.

(via owning-my-truth)

sandandglass:

Jon Stewart and Matt Taibbi discuss the different treatment afforded to ‘street’ and white-collar criminals. 

(via fyeahcracker)